Posts Tagged ‘Peach Research’

The Scale of the Problem

The Current State of Scale Management in Southeastern Peach Production— A Summary from 2017 Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable Conference Presentation

San Jose scale (SJS), Comstockaspis perniciosus (Comstock), is an herbivorous insect pest that infests an enormous variety of plants worldwide, and is currently one of the most distressing pests of peach production in the southeastern U.S.  San Jose scale is an indirect pest of peach, normally feeding on plant tissues, which can cause leaf chlorosis, twig or limb die-back, and even death of trees.  As the populations build, SJS can become a direct pest by feeding on fruit, which produces small, red lesions on the skin (See Figure 1).  Young trees can die within three years of heavy infestation and mature trees have drastically reduced vigor and yields, potentially reducing the productive lifespan of an orchard. Read More…

 

Editor’s Note: A Recent Collaborative Effort Between Clemson and UF

Mutant strains of peach anthracnose can mean big problems for growers.  These diseases can be difficult to control with standard pesticides like Abound, Topsin M, Scala, and others.  Researchers at Clemson University, including Dr. Guido Schnabel, are not going to let pathogens get the best of growers though.  They have been testing the efficacy of fungicides to determine how best to control new diseases as they crop up.  This research helps determine when Inspire Super or Orbit is the best pesticide to use, or if you should mix Orbit with Inspire Super. Read More…

 

Combatting Fungicide Resistance in Strawberry Nurseries

UF/IFAS and Clemson University use peach research to benefit strawberry industry

Sweet, succulent strawberries have to start out somewhere, and that generally means the nursery. Before they make it onto shelves throughout the U.S. and the world from fields in Florida and California, they have to survive and thrive. Proper care in the nursery will lead to healthy, productive plants in the growers’ fields. Unfortunately, early introduction of pesticides and fungicides can result in disease resistant plants making it into the fields. A joint research project between the University of Florida and Clemson University in South Carolina seeks to eradicate this problem. Read More…