Archive for February, 2017

Grower 411

 

FAWN Tools to Help Florida Orchardists Make Decisions that Save Resources

The Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN), a program of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) uses data from its network of 42 stations for a variety of weather-related tools that can aid Florida growers in making irrigation and cold protection decisions.  Growers rely on FAWN weather data to monitor current conditions, and FAWN tools for making decisions related to irrigation, freeze protection, and chemical application.  FAWN has been proven very useful in helping growers save both water and dollars.  For example, UF/IFAS estimates that the use of FAWN tools on cold nights can potentially generate savings of millions of dollars and billions of gallons of water statewide.   Read More…

 

How Much Water do Florida Peaches Need?

Recent Research Suggests that Reducing Irrigation Volume Rates May Not Have Effect on Fruit Yield and Quality

 

Fruit and vegetable growers across the United Sates are facing several challenges to remain profitable and Florida peach growers are not the exception.  State regulations, labor, and optimization of cultural practices are just some of the factors affecting agriculture in Florida.  Optimizing cultural practices, particularly irrigation, is one of the most difficult tasks growers must deal with.  Increasing competition for water between urban areas and farms has attracted the attention of government agencies and researchers, and growers are willing to incorporate techniques to improve irrigation practices. Read More…

 

The Scale of the Problem

The Current State of Scale Management in Southeastern Peach Production— A Summary from 2017 Southeast Regional Fruit and Vegetable Conference Presentation

San Jose scale (SJS), Comstockaspis perniciosus (Comstock), is an herbivorous insect pest that infests an enormous variety of plants worldwide, and is currently one of the most distressing pests of peach production in the southeastern U.S.  San Jose scale is an indirect pest of peach, normally feeding on plant tissues, which can cause leaf chlorosis, twig or limb die-back, and even death of trees.  As the populations build, SJS can become a direct pest by feeding on fruit, which produces small, red lesions on the skin (See Figure 1).  Young trees can die within three years of heavy infestation and mature trees have drastically reduced vigor and yields, potentially reducing the productive lifespan of an orchard. Read More…

 

State of the Industry

Update on Regulatory and Legislative Priorities, USDA Purchases of Frozen Peaches, and More

 

Congressman Ralph Abraham (R-LA) is working to streamline a segment of the H-2A process that will reduce the wait time when applying for H-2A Labor.   Read More…

 

A Peachy Outlook for the Season Ahead

Georgia Experts Talk Chill Hours, Drought, and Other Factors for Commercial Peach

 

Peaches are just getting going in Georgia.  Growers are getting into “peach mode,” and by all accounts, the season seems off to a great start.  Both Dario Chavez, an assistant professor in Peach Research and Extension in the Horticulture Department at the University of Georgia, and Duke Lane, the president of the Georgia Peach Council and part of Genuine Georgia, a company that represents and markets for commercial peach growers of Georgia, gave the season a “thumbs up” as it is, even despite issues with drought and lack of chill hours.  Chavez and Lane agree that the season is right on track. Read More…